The San Francisco Housing Action Coalition (SFHAC) and Bay Area Housing Advocacy Coalition (BayHAC) are working to solve the region’s affordability and displacement crisis by creating new housing opportunities for residents at all income levels. Our City, region and state needs more affordable housing, more moderate-income housing, and more market-rate housing.

The HAC believes that the City of San Francisco needs to build 5,000 every year for the next 20 years and all policy goals need to be intended on helping us hit that annual goal. To help our City meet its challenges, we’re working to improve San Francisco’s development process to incentivize more affordable housing, ensure that what is built is well-designed and well-located, support new development with transportation and infrastructure improvements, and minimize unnecessary delays to building it.

We also provide accurate, real-time information to the public, policy makers, and elected officials about San Francisco’s housing crisis and proposed legislation. The SFHAC does not work alone, and will push its members, community stakeholders and City government to design and implement the policies and practices that will most effectively address our housing affordability crisis.


SFHAC and BayHAC 2020 POLICY AGENDA

Updated March 2020


The San Francisco Housing Action Coalition (SFHAC) and Bay Area Housing Advocacy Coalition (BayHAC) are working to solve our local and state affordability and displacement crises by creating new housing opportunities for residents at all income levels. Our city, region, and state need more affordable housing, more middle-income housing, and more market-rate housing.


The HAC believes that the city of San Francisco needs to build 5,000 homes every year for the next 20 years, and that our organizational and programming goals should further that mission. California has a statewide shortage of over 3.5 million new homes. To help our city and region meet these challenges, we’re working to improve the development process to incentivize more affordable housing, ensure that what is built is well-designed and well-located, to support new development with transportation and infrastructure improvements, and to minimize unnecessary costs and delays to building it.


We also provide accurate, real-time information to the public, policymakers, and elected officials about the Bay Area’s housing crisis and housing-related legislation. SFHAC and BayHAC do not do their work alone. We engage our members, community stakeholders, and all levels of city and county government in designing and implementing the policies and practices that will most effectively address our housing affordability crisis.


In 2020, HAC’s proposed policy agenda is as follows:


Housing Production Legislation 

Learning from SB 50, SFHAC will work with our advocacy and elected allies to pass meaningful statewide housing production legislation. While last year was a win for housing “protection” bills, we need to get “production” bills passed in 2020. Early production bills we’ve endorsed include SB 899 and SB 902.


Local implementation of SB 330 and other laws

SB 330 passed in 2019, but local implementation remains opaque or non-existent at the local level. It’s important that SFHAC continues to push for the local implementation of this and other state laws; we’ll continue to engage in 2020 with efforts like contacting local governments, recording information from our members, and relaying data to Senator Skinner’s office and HCD.


Continue to Build Relationships with Leadership at San Francisco’s Changing Planning and Home-Building Departments

In 2020 SFHAC will continue to grow our network of connections with elected officials, home builders, and advocates, and to facilitate critical communication between top-level decision-makers. 


CEQA Reform

CEQA, the California Environmental Quality Act, is frequently misused to obstruct new housing. We’ll work with stakeholders in the development, labor, and advocacy communities to find ways to improve the law while actually creating meaningful environmental protections.


SF Charter Amendment: November 2020 Ballot

SFHAC will work to pass Mayor London Breed’s proposed amendment to San Francisco’s City Charter. The Charter Amendment, Measure A on November’s ballot if the campaign succeeds in qualifying, would streamline the production of 100% subsidized affordable housing, teacher housing, and any mixed-income housing that has 15% more than the required number of inclusionary units.


Sustain and Expand Relationships with Local Businesses, Employers, and Elected Officials

Maintain and develop relationships with important local elected officials, such as Big City Mayors’ London Breed, Libby Schaaf, and Sam Liccardo plus smaller city elected officials around the Bay Area. SFHAC and BayHAC will continue to foster relationships with critical pro-housing allies in government and other important sectors in 2020.


Expand the Pro-Housing Tent 

SFHAC and BayHAC will intentionally and continually engage diverse stakeholders such as faith communities, environmental and equity groups, labor unions, and more to learn about our areas of common interests and share resources about the importance of production and preservation in addressing the housing crisis.


Prop 13 Reform: Split Roll, November 2020

A “split roll” applies a different tax formula (either in the form of tax rate, reassessment frequency, or vote requirement) to commercial and industrial properties than that applied to residential properties. Proponents of a split roll would remove some of the protections of California’s Proposition 13 from nonresidential properties in order to raise




 

Current Initiatives 

More Equitable Citywide Development

 

Right now, 80 percent of new development is taking place on 20 percent of the land. San Francisco needs to do a better job of adding housing across all of its neighborhoods, particularly along transit corridors.

 

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Transit and Infrastructure 

 

We are fully aware that with new housing and residents comes a greater need for transit and infrastructure. SFHAC is looking into ways new residential development can better directly fund these necessary improvements.

 

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Eastern Waterfront Use

 

Much of the City’s historic waterfront industrial uses are gone, leaving significant amounts of underutilized land. SFHAC believes this land can be transformed into vibrant neighborhoods that balance housing with jobs and transit.

 

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Past Initiatives

Student Housing

 

SFHAC led the work in helping to pass two student housing ordinances. The two pieces of legislation were created to incentive the creation of new student housing, a product that is severely lacking in San Francisco.

 

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Prop C: Housing Trust Fund

 

In 2012, the SFHAC supported and helped pass Prop C, the Housing Trust Fund. We were part of the working group that established Prop C’s terms as well as supported the political campaign for its passage.

 

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Neighborhood Planning

 

We provided advocacy for adoption of the rezoning contained in five neighborhood plans: Eastern Neighborhoods, Market and Octavia, Balboa Park, Central Subway Corridor and the Transit Center District.

 

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Inclusionary Housing Ordinance

 

In 2002, members of SFHAC got together with then-Supervisor Mark Leno to help draft and pass the City’s first inclusionary housing ordinance. It has since undergone a couple of revisions, but it is still one of our chief sources of funding to subsidize housing affordability.

 

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Micro-Units

 

SFHAC worked with Supervisor Scott Wiener in 2011 to help pass legislation that allows building micro-units. It is unlikely that micro-units will ever be more than a niche product, but it is important we continue to look for innovative, more affordable products.

 

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Local CEQA Reform

 

The SFHAC worked with Supervisor Scott Wiener to successfully pass some minor modifications to the City’s interpretation of CEQA, the California Environmental Quality Act. There is still much work to improve the city's process.

 

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